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Skippers tips: Adapt your boat & prevent corrosion

Updated: Nov 25

(Article originally published by yachtingmonthly.com)


Adapt the boat to meet your needs


Most tasks onboard are easier and faster with two people.


Dan and I usually work as a team to get jobs done on Uma, whether it’s boat work or sailing related.


However, we also believe it is essential that we are able to sail the boat individually.

You never know what may happen: one of us could get sick and be unable to help.

It is vital each of us can confidently reach the next port solo.

Over the years we’ve practiced single-handed sailing several times, and found ways to better configure our rigging so that I, as a small female sailor, can also easily operate everything by myself.

One of the myths about sailing that I have come across is that it requires sheer strength.

I am not a very tall person, nor do I have the muscles that average male sailors possess, but I find you can develop the right technique to meet any challenge, even if it takes a bit longer to get the task done.


Kika Mevs


Invest in dinghy chaps


There is no doubt that we have found our dinghy chaps (covers) well worth the investment.

A good sound dinghy is absolutely essential when cruising, and particularly important if there are no marinas or you want to avoid using marinas.


We have found on our travels that dinghy pontoons have been of very variable quality, frequently crowded with outboards left tilted up, and often with numerous dinghy-lethal sharp edges and old nails.


Beach landings can be frequent, and they have their fair share of dangers for the dinghy.

Combined with the very damaging effects of ultraviolet light, particularly in hot climates, the poor old dinghy can have a hazardous time.


Dinghy chaps are canvas covers and will extend the life of your plastic dinghy and reduce the amount of time spent patching and blowing it up.


The job of patching the dinghy chaps is much less urgent and relatively easy.


We have found just sticking a new bit of canvas over the damage works very well.


We had our chaps made in Bequia in the Caribbean, but any competent canvas worker should be able to do this job reasonably easily.


Julian & Patricia Morgan


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